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Moving up and down e-mail selections

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andy t View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote andy t Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Moving up and down e-mail selections
    Posted: 13/May/2009 at 1:50pm

Hi, me again :-)

I have literally got over 300 or so emails and the scenario is, when I am looking at all my e-mails and searching for one in particular, if I cough when using speech recognition, I notice the highlighted e-mail bar shoots right down to my bottom e-mail and I mean the very bottom!

If this happens, at the moment I have to keep on saying, “go up 20”, “go up 20” “go up 20” until it reaches the top again which can be very tedious especially if I cough again, then it always goes back down to the bottom again and so I have to repeat the scenario.

I know there is a search bar so you can type the name of the person and it will find it for you but I cannot always remember the name of the e-mail or subject or name.        

When it is at the bottom, is there a simple command which I could say to take it right to the top again?  Something like, “go up to top” which would then move the highlighted e-mail bar right to the top?

Is “go up 20” or “go down 20” or “go right 20” or “go left 20” the maximum number of places I can move the cursor at any one time?  Or going back to the e-mail situation is there a simple command that I can use to move it from the bottom of the e-mail pile to the top of the e-mail pile?

andy t
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Post Options Post Options   Quote russ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/May/2009 at 6:59pm

andy t,

You should be able to say one of these two go to the very bottom or the very top. Words in parentheses can be omitted if you'd rather not say them:
 
Go to (the) top
Go two (the) bottom
 
-Russ
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mmarkoe_admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/May/2009 at 8:16pm
Originally posted by andy t

Or going back to the e-mail situation is there a simple command that I can use to move it from the bottom of the e-mail pile to the top of the e-mail pile?andy t
I'd tried the suggestions by Russ in Microsoft Outlook 2007 but they did not work for me. What works are the commands, "Press control page up," and "Press control page down."
 
Marty


Edited by mmarkoe_admin - 13/May/2009 at 8:17pm
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Post Options Post Options   Quote russ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/May/2009 at 8:43pm
Whoops! I should have tried it first! It looks like I created a couple of macros to do this.
-Russ
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mmarkoe_admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/May/2009 at 10:46pm
Originally posted by russ

Whoops! I should have tried it first! It looks like I created a couple of macros to do this.
Creating macros is a good idea. Here are the 2 macros, created with the WSRToolkit Command Macro feature:
 
1. Go to top (do not add this line)
<!-- Command macro created with WSRToolkit (Version: 1.5.0.1) 5/13/2009 8:41:19 PM -->
<speechMacros>
<command>
<condition operator="not">
<appIsInForeground processName="WSRToolkit.exe"/>
</condition>
<listenFor>Go to top</listenFor>
<sendKeys>{{CTRL}}{PGUP}</sendKeys>
</command>
</speechMacros>

 
2. Go to bottom (do not add this line)
<!-- Command macro created with WSRToolkit (Version: 1.5.0.1) 5/13/2009 8:41:41 PM -->
<speechMacros>
<command>
<condition operator="not">
<appIsInForeground processName="WSRToolkit.exe"/>
</condition>
<listenFor>Go to bottom</listenFor>
<sendKeys>{{CTRL}}{PGDN}</sendKeys>
</command>
</speechMacros>


Edited by mmarkoe_admin - 13/May/2009 at 10:47pm
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Post Options Post Options   Quote andy t Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/May/2009 at 10:28am
[QUOTE= admin]I'd tried the suggestions by Russ in Microsoft Outlook 2007 but they did not work for me. What works are the commands, "Press control page up," and "Press control page down."[QUOTE/]
 

I tried Russ’s theory as well and it did not work.  When I tried your one Marty in my e-mail inbox, I said “Press control page up” and "Press control page down” and all it did was move up or down 12 times so I am better off saying “go up 20” or “go down 20”, is 20 the most the cursor can move at any one time?  For instance, you cannot say go up 40?

Regarding the macro you have shown Marty, do I just simply open the WSRToolkit >Text Macros then just dictate in exactly your simple equation regarding that particular command?

I still have not got the book about making macros, I must get this.  Is it true that you can make a macro perform a certain command in almost anything?

So if 20 is the most the cursor can move in any direction, is it possible to make a macro so that you can move it 40 say?

andy t 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote andy t Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/May/2009 at 12:37pm

Marty,

I had a little play with the WSR toolkit.  I now realise that your equations are command macros as opposed to text macros.

I went into the WSR tool kit> command macros >

In the “In the context of” box I left it at “global all applications”

I typed in the “when I say box” “go to top”

I passed on “simulate key press”

I then went to the “find a program” box and selected “Windows Mail”>“WinMail.exe”

I then clicked the “add program” box which put the program sequence automatically in the “command sequence viewer”.

I then tried to cut and paste your “go to top” equation in the “command sequence viewer” underneath the program sequence but it would not let me paste this in and I could not get a cursor to sit in the “command sequence viewer” but when I checked in the “macro editor” all your command sequence for “go to top” was there so I pressed save so it would save it in “macros” and when I tried it in my e-mail inbox, it still would not work.

Am I putting this macro in the wrong program?  If so, what is the correct program to use for emails in your inbox with this macro?

Can you tell me what mistakes I have made?

Cheers

andy t
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Post Options Post Options   Quote russ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/May/2009 at 1:06pm

andy t,

The WSR Toolkit manual on page 8 shows a screenshot of the "command macros" tab. From the looks of it, you don't need to use the "find a program" button to do what you want to do. Here are the steps to create a "go to top" command. (Note that the keystroke is Ctrl-Home, not Ctrl-Page Up.)

1. Leave "in the context of" set to Global so that you can use the command in any application, not just your mail program.

2. Type "go to top" into the When I Say box.

3. Set the "simulate key press" area to execute a CTRL-HOME keyboard shortcut and click Add to put it into the Command Sequence Viewer.

4. Click the "Create Macro with Command Sequence" button.

To create the command for "go to bottom," repeat the steps but use different wording for the command and the CTRL-END keyboard shortcut.

That should do the trick!

-Russ

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Post Options Post Options   Quote andy t Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/May/2009 at 2:46pm

Russ,

Thank you for your response and diagnostics.

I did exactly what you said and it still does not work within my e-mail inbox.

I did get an error message when I clicked “create macro with command sequence”.  When the error message came up I clicked OK and then it disappeared and underneath it was a little box which said “Done” which I clicked and then tried the macro in my e-mail inbox but it did not work.

The error message said this: -

“Error loading Speech Macros!”

0x800B0100:

No signature was present in the subject.

Any ideas what this means and is this stopping me making the macros that you mention?

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Post Options Post Options   Quote mmarkoe_admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/May/2009 at 4:24pm
Originally posted by andy t

The error message said this: - “Error loading Speech Macros!” 0x800B0100:

No signature was present in the subject.

Any ideas what this means and is this stopping me making the macros that you mention?

In the lower right taskbar of your screen should be an oval shaped blue icon. When you roll the mouse pointer over the icon it will say Windows Speech Recognition Macros. Right click (not left click) this icon. Choose security and then choose set security level. Then choose Low even though it is not recommended, you are not compromising security.
 
This is the most likely reason you have not been able to create macros. Any instructions for the windows speech recognition toolkit we mention you must set the security level to low.
 
Marty


Edited by mmarkoe_admin - 14/May/2009 at 4:28pm
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Post Options Post Options   Quote andy t Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/May/2009 at 5:34pm

WOW!  That worked a treat!

Setting the security level to low worked. Thanks Marty and thank you to Russ for teaching me how to do my very first macro believe it or not!  It is like being a kid and being let loose in a toy factory!  (Perhaps that is a little over reaction I guess) :-)

I know you will probably tell me off Marty for not buying the book on how to make macros but I will I promise.  Can you or Russ just teach me one more?

If I want to make a macro and I want to say “go up 40” or “go down 40” or “go left 40” or “go right 40” to make the cursor or e-mail move 40 times in the direction that you command, how would I go about this?

Would I be right in saying that the above is 4 different commands and therefore 4 completely different macros?

Cheers

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Post Options Post Options   Quote russ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/May/2009 at 5:53pm

Andy T,

There is a way that you could create a single macro that would do all the four direction movements, but it sounds like you're having fun making macros yourself, so here's a way you can do it with both WSR Toolkit and a little bit of hand editing.

I'm assuming that what you really want to do is the equivalent of pressing the arrow key 40 times.

1. Use the Command Macros tab in WSR Toolkit to create four macros named like you want. In the Simulate Keypress area, make each macro move just a single arrow movement: Up, Down, Left, and Right.

2. Use Windows Explorer to display the Speech Macros folder. You should see files there that are named after the macros you created. They have .WSRMac extensions.

3. One at a time, open each file in a text editor like Wordpad or Notepad. You should see a line like the following, which will vary based on the direction key in the macro:

<sendKeys>{UP}</sendKeys>

4. Change the line to look like this:

<sendKeys times="40">{UP}</sendKeys>

5. Save and close the file. If you get any kind of error messages, that means there's probably a syntax error in the file that needs to be fixed.

6. Repeat the steps for the other three files, and you should have macro commands that are ready to go!

-Russ

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Post Options Post Options   Quote andy t Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15/May/2009 at 7:07pm
There is a way that you could create a single macro that would do all the four direction movements, but it sounds like you're having fun making macros yourself, so here's a way you can do it with both WSR Toolkit and a little bit of hand editing.

I'm assuming that what you really want to do is the equivalent of pressing the arrow key 40 times.

Yes, each way, right, left, up and down.
 
1. Use the Command Macros tab in WSR Toolkit to create four macros named like you want. In the Simulate Keypress area, make each macro move just a single arrow movement: Up, Down, Left, and Right.
 
Not quite sure what you mean here Russ, can you elaborate on what a single arrow movement is? Could you demonstrate it for me?

2. Use Windows Explorer to display the Speech Macros folder. You should see files there that are named after the macros you created. They have .WSRMac extensions.

When you say use Windows Explorer to display the Speech Macros folder, Not quite sure what you mean here either? Do you mean the little blue Macros bubble icon in the task bar at the bottom right of the screen? If not could you explain this to me and how to get this up? 
 
3. One at a time, open each file in a text editor like Wordpad or Notepad. You should see a line like the following, which will vary based on the direction key in the macro:
 
Do you mean copy and paste each one into Wordpad or Notepad one at a time?
 

<sendKeys>{UP}</sendKeys>

4. Change the line to look like this:

<sendKeys times="40">{UP}</sendKeys>

Looking at the final line above, do you mean change the position of those arrows shown in your equation?
 
If not could you give me some examples? 

6. Repeat the steps for the other three files, and you should have macro commands that are ready to go!

Hmmm... I think I know what you mean Confused, so in the end would each command be slightly different as I speak it to go to their respected directions?
 
Sorry for appearing a bit thick but this is all new to me and I should really get that book.
 
One other question for you.
 
When the WSR tool kit is open and you select command macros, then you pick a command to use and put it in the "When I Say" box then after that when you go to the "Simulate Keypress", can you pick any of the three "ALT", "CTRL" or "Shift" with any of the "Command Keys" for any Macro you care to choose?
 
Cheers
 
Andy
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Post Options Post Options   Quote russ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17/May/2009 at 1:31pm

Andy T,

Regarding question #1, I am referring to the four arrow keys on your keyboard.

Regarding question #2, Windows Explorer is a program that you can use for viewing files on your computer. You can access it by saying "Start Windows Explorer." Then you can navigate to display the Speech Macros folder, which is where your speech macros are stored.

At that point, you should see that WSR Toolkit creates individual files for the macros that you create with the WSR Toolkit. You can open and edit these files with any program that reads text files such as the Notepad and Wordpad programs that are included with Windows.

Regarding question #3, what I'm referring to here is opening each of the four text files for the macros you created and making a slight editing change to a single line in each file.

Regarding question #4, the modified line contains a little bit of additional text inserted in a specific location:

times="40"

This little bit if additional text causes the keystroke to execute 40 times instead of once.

Regarding question #6, since there are four files that need to be edited, after you do the first one, you need to repeat the steps three additional times for the three additional files.

And as for your final question, the answer is yes. You can use one, any, or all of ALT, CTRL, and SHIFT in order to execute keyboard shortcuts that involve any combination of those keys.

A final note: because I don't use WSR Toolkit regularly to edit macros, I overlooked an easier approach to making the... times="40" ...modification to the macros. Notice that when you're looking at the Command Macros tab in WSR Toolkit, there is a Macro Editor tab as well. You can click this tab and make the text modification directly in WSR Toolkit, which is easier than using a separate application like Notepad or WordPad. (See the WSR Toolkit manual for more information about this.)

Good luck! I hope you post back letting Marty and I know how it goes.

-Russ

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Post Options Post Options   Quote andy t Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18/May/2009 at 11:16am

High Russ,

After careful studying of your instructions, I believe I eventually fathomed out what you meant. It was all going well and I made the macros but the outcome did not come out as I wanted it.

Let me explain what I did and then you can tell me if or where I went wrong?

Regarding question #1, I am referring to the four arrow keys on your keyboard.

Yes I got that, I created four macros just as you said. Let me show you on just one of the examples which I did because the other three were exactly the same except for the direction which I wanted the cursor to go as you mention.

In the WSR Tool Kit>Command Macros, I then put in the command I wanted in the “When I Say Box” which was in this case “Go up 40”.  I did not check any of the “ALT”, “CTRL” or “SHIFT” boxes.  I simply chose “Up” from the “Command Key” selection.  I then added and created it.

Regarding question #2, Windows Explorer is a program that you can use for viewing files on your computer. You can access it by saying "Start Windows Explorer." Then you can navigate to display the Speech Macros folder, which is where your speech macros are stored.

When you mentioned “Windows Explorer”, I was getting confused with “Internet Explorer”. I thought you meant some program on the Web! Confused

Anyway, I found there are several ways to get to these macros. There is your way, you can get to them by clicking the blue speech bubble icon in the bottom right of your task bar, you can get to them by saying “Open Speech Macros” or you can get to them by going to “My Documents” and the folder is in there. They are actually in the “Notepad” application.

At that point, you should see that WSR Toolkit creates individual files for the macros that you create with the WSR Toolkit. You can open and edit these files with any program that reads text files such as the Notepad and Wordpad programs that are included with Windows.

When I was in the macros folder, I clicked File>Speech Macros>Edit. I then found the macro I had created for “Go up 40”. So I did as you said and cut and pasted it into Wordpad.  Sure enough, it showed the macro with the line in it exactly as you said like thus: -

<sendKeys>{UP}</ sendKeys>

 
Regarding question #3, what I'm referring to here is opening each of the four text files for the macros you created and making a slight editing change to a single line in each file.

Regarding question #4, the modified line contains a little bit of additional text inserted in a specific location:

times="40"

I did just that and edited the text just as you instructed. Here I show you an example of just one of them. (The “Go up 40” command)

<!-- Command macro created with WSRToolkit (Version: 1.5.0.2) 17/05/2009 18:45:56 -->

<speechMacros>

<command>

<condition operator="not">

<appIsInForeground processName="WSRToolkit.exe"/>

</condition>

<listenFor>Go up 40</listenFor>

<sendKeys times="40">{UP}</sendKeys>

</command>

</speechMacros>

This little bit if additional text causes the keystroke to execute 40 times instead of once.

That’s what I was hoping but now when I say “Go up 40” or any of the other directional commands to the screen now, it only moves 20 times in any one direction and I have already got that command in my speech recognition program.

Not only that, now when I say “Go up 4” or “Go Down 4” or any of the other directional moves, it moves the cursor or emails 20 times in the direction I am commanding it whereas before it only use to move 4 times! 

Where am I going wrong?

Regarding question #6, since there are four files that need to be edited, after you do the first one, you need to repeat the steps three additional times for the three additional files.

As I explained, I did that but the same thing was happening in any directional move.

And as for your final question, the answer is yes. You can use one, any, or all of ALT, CTRL, and SHIFT in order to execute keyboard shortcuts that involve any combination of those keys.

So for example, reading the above, could I have checked the “CTRL” box + “Up” in the “Command Key” selection? Or could I have checked the “ALT” box + “Up” in the “Command Key” selection?  Or any other combination?  Does it matter which one you use for a certain command?

A final note: because I don't use WSR Toolkit regularly to edit macros, I overlooked an easier approach to making the... times="40" ...modification to the macros. Notice that when you're looking at the Command Macros tab in WSR Toolkit, there is a Macro Editor tab as well. You can click this tab and make the text modification directly in WSR Toolkit, which is easier than using a separate application like Notepad or WordPad. (See the WSR Toolkit manual for more information about this.)

Yes, as I explained earlier in this post, there are several ways to get your speech macros.  I soon found this out.  So after doing all that as you instructed, why does it only move 20 times and not 40 times?

Perhaps I need to delete those macros and try are again. What do you think?  Have you got any other ideas to make these sure fire commands?

andy t

 

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Post Options Post Options   Quote russ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18/May/2009 at 7:35pm

Andy T,

Don't delete the macros. Make modifications to them in the Macro Editor tab of WSR Toolkit until they work the way you want.

I'm speculating because I haven't tried it, but I believe the reason the command is only executing 20 times is that there is an upper limit on the number of repeats that are supported in the <sendKeys> command. The way to fix this problem would be to repeat the command twice in each of the four macros as follows:

<sendKeys times="20">{UP}</sendKeys>
<sendKeys times="20">{UP}</sendKeys>

Each command executes, which gives you a total of 40 moves.

Regarding the problem where the command "go down 4" is now moving down 20 times, the problem is that WSR is misinterpreting 4 as 40, and it's executing a different command. I think you had a similar problem with some other commands, and I advised renaming the command that made it more distinctive. You could do the same thing here. For example, you could change the command names of each macro to something like "Way up 40" or "Jump up 40" to make them a little different than the built-in commands.

As for your question about whether or not to check the Alt, Control, and Shift check boxes, different combinations of these keys perform different functions. For example, saying "press up arrow" moves the insertion point up one line. But saying "press Control up arrow" moves the insertion point to the beginning of the current line or paragraph. You only want to choose these check boxes when you know what it's going to do.

The main point to grasp here is that it's really important to learn keyboard shortcuts for the applications you want to use if you want to be successful at creating macros. Many valuable macros can be created by simply providing a name for the macro and setting up the macro to execute a keyboard shortcut that you want. Fortunately, there are a lot of good sources for learning the keyboard shortcuts in programs, such as printed manuals and online help that came with the program, or Google searches.

-Russ

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Post Options Post Options   Quote mmarkoe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19/May/2009 at 1:53am
Andy,
 
I agree with Russ that learning keyboard shortcuts (or printing out a list of them) will make it easy to create command macros and eventually scripting macros. I just click the Start button, Help and then do a search for, "Keyboard Shortcuts."
 
Marty
 
PS. When you feel ready to tackle scripting, let me know and we will send you a copy of the Scripting Book.
Marty Markoe, MVP
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Post Options Post Options   Quote andy t Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19/May/2009 at 9:15am

“AMAZING!” that worked Russ.  I changed the command from “go up 40” to “Jump up 40” and doubled up on the “send keys 20” line just as you instructed, did it with all four directions and now it works a treat.  Thanks for that. Ingenious little tool the WSRToolkit is.

 

I agree with Russ that learning keyboard shortcuts (or printing out a list of them) will make it easy to create command macros and eventually scripting macros. I just click the Start button, Help and then do a search for, "Keyboard Shortcuts."

 

Marty

 

PS. When you feel ready to tackle scripting, let me know and we will send you a copy of the Scripting Book.

 

So you do need to know what the keyboard shortcuts do. I thought that initially.  I will acquire a list of the shortcuts on a keyboard just like you say Marty and thanks for your offer of sending me a copy of the Scripting Book; perhaps you could send me a copy shortly. Dare I ask what “Scripting Macros” means?

 

I now would like to have a go at producing a text macro. I know I can read up on this which I will but could you show me an example?

 

Say I wanted to do the same as you Marty and say “Sign Off” and my name appeared how would I do this?

 

andy t 

 

 

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Post Options Post Options   Quote mmarkoe_admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19/May/2009 at 1:07pm
Originally posted by andy t

So you do need to know what the keyboard shortcuts do. I thought that initially.  I will acquire a list of the shortcuts on a keyboard just like you say Marty and thanks for your offer of sending me a copy of the Scripting Book; perhaps you could send me a copy shortly. Dare I ask what “Scripting Macros” means?
Just E-mailed it to you.
 
I now would like to have a go at producing a text macro. I know I can read up on this which I will but could you show me an example?

 

Say I wanted to do the same as you Marty and say “Sign Off” and my name appeared how would I do this?

Click on the Text Macros of the WSRToolkit.  In the box that says, "When I say," say your keyboard in, "Sign-off" of course leave off quotes.  Move down to Insert The Text.  Put in the text as you want it to appear.  Then click the save button and you were finished.  If you ever want to modify the text, open up the Macro Editor tab and then click the Open button. You will see how it has created a scripting macro without you having to learn any scripting. 
 
Marty
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Post Options Post Options   Quote andy t Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19/May/2009 at 1:39pm

I just click the Start button, Help and then do a search for, "Keyboard Shortcuts."

 

Marty,

I did what you said and typed in “keyboard shortcuts” in the Microsoft help search bar and it brought up hundreds under different headings. I list the headings below.

 “Ease of Access keyboard shortcuts”

 “General keyboard shortcuts”

 “Dialog box keyboard shortcuts”

 “Microsoft keyboard shortcuts”

 “Windows Explorer Keyboard Shortcuts”

 “Windows Sidebar keyboard shortcuts”

 “Windows Photo Gallery keyboard shortcuts”

 “Windows Help viewer keyboard shortcuts”

Surely I only need the “General keyboard shortcuts” so I can tell which one will work with what macro I make?  Do I need the others?

andy t   

 

 

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Post Options Post Options   Quote mmarkoe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19/May/2009 at 3:31pm
Originally posted by andy t

Surely I only need the “General keyboard shortcuts” so I can tell which one will work with what macro I make?  Do I need the others? 
Only you can decide which ones' are important to you?
 
Marty
Marty Markoe, MVP
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See us at: http://www.mymsspeech.com
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